Red is Not Black

Rachel Dolezal and Andrea Smith: Integrity, Ethics, Accountability, Identity

[… a more productive place to begin might be to ask why there has not been any noticeable difference in professional or political expectations of Smith—in her self-presentations, speaking engagements, professional service, and publications? There are certainly many people who knew/know, so why have her ethics and integrity not been questioned or challenged in the same or similar way to those of Dolezal? Why does Smith’s fraud get excused on the grounds of “her good work” but Dolezal does not?

Meanwhile, we’ll all fail to ask why, as Dolezal and Smith present themselves through such complicated personal stories of childhood abuse and family dysfunction, we respond so differently to Dolezal’s blackface and Smith’s redface. We’ll avoid the opportunity to think out loud together about why it seems the entire nation demands accountability of someone pretending to be Black–of literally altering her physical appearance to conform to racist expectations of Blackness–but doesn’t seem to give one iota of concern about those who pretend to be Indian.]

Read the full opinion article | tequilasovereign

ANDREASMITH

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South Carolina’s Waving, Soothing Confederate Flags

Neil Degrasse Replies | X Treasury Security and Harvard Uni. President L. Summers Suggested that Genetic Differences May Explain Why There are Fewer Girls in Science

Neil Degrasse Replies | X Treasury Security and Harvard Uni. President L. Summers Suggested that Genetic Differences May Explain Why There are Fewer Girls in Science

Additions to My Photography Portfolio | Critique & Opinions Welcome


CAFE_MULES

HORSIE

NATIVE GAZE SILVER PUEBLO

PORTFOLIO TAOS22

RITA 4

TAOS FACADE

TREE REFLECTION

YAMPA GIRL 2

The Bleached Bones of the Dead: What the Modern World Owes Slavery

Slaves working on James Hopkinson's plantation. (Photo: Henry P. Moore)

The Bleached Bones of the Dead: What the Modern World Owes Slavery.

[…. Consider, for example, the way the advancement of medical knowledge was paid for with the lives of slaves.

The death rate on the trans-Atlantic voyage to the New World was staggeringly high. Slave ships, however, were floating laboratories, offering researchers a chance to examine the course of diseases in fairly controlled, quarantined environments. Doctors and medical researchers could take advantage of high mortality rates to identify a bewildering number of symptoms, classify them into diseases, and hypothesize about their causes.

Corps of doctors tended to slave ports up and down the Atlantic seaboard. Some of them were committed to relieving suffering; others were simply looking for ways to make the slave system more profitable. In either case, they identified types of fevers, learned how to decrease mortality and increase fertility, and identified the best ratio of caloric intake to labor hours. Priceless epidemiological information on a range of diseases — malaria, smallpox, yellow fever, dysentery, typhoid, cholera, and so on — was gleaned from the bodies of the dying and the dead…]