The Rise And Fall of Ken Wilber

[Ken Wilber is the smartest man you’ve never heard of. He’s a philosopher and mystic whose work attempts to integrate all fields of study into one single model or framework of understanding.

As humans, we have a tendency to cling to ideologies. Any positive set of beliefs can quickly turn malevolent once treated as ideology and not an honest intellectual or experiential pursuit of greater truth. Ideology does in entire economic systems and countries, causes religions to massacre thousands, turns human rights movements into authoritarian sects and makes fools out of humanity’s most brilliant minds. Einstein famously wasted the second half of his career trying to calculate a cosmological constant that didn’t exist because “God doesn’t play dice.”]       Read the full article | MARK MANSON blog

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“Never Hit Below the Belt” and an Unscientific Guide to Why Men Don’t Kick Each Other in the Nuts

[The question was posed by a woman on Yahoo! Answers: “If you dislike each other enough to want them to get hurt,” she asked, “why not do the worst?”

The answers, admittedly unscientific, were interesting. One of the common responses involved the idea that not hitting below the belt was “an unspoken rule.” Maybe it’s the Golden Rule—do onto others as you would have them do unto you—and some men mentioned that, but others suggested that it was a rule specific to manhood. It’s a “cheap shot,” said one. A “low blow,” said another.

Not hitting below the belt, then, protects the idea that men’s bodies are fighting machines. It protects masculinity, the very idea that men are big and strong, pain- and impact-resistant, impenetrable like an edifice. So not hitting below the belt doesn’t just protect individual men from pain, it protects our ideas about masculinity.

When a man hits below the belt, he is revealing to everyone present that masculinity is a fiction. That’s why one guy said: “For ‘alpha male’ fights, nut shots are just wrong.” Alpha male fights are about figuring out which male is alpha, while preserving the idea that the alpha male is a thing that matters.]  Read the full article | Sociological Images

BOXING

Memory Theaters 2 | A Photo Album

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Three Magi | @2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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The Kiss | @2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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Island in the Sky | Canyonlands National Park | Utah, USA |@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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Memory Theaters 5 |@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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Arches National Park | Utah, USA |@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

Memory Theaters | A Photo Album

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SE Utah

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Arches National Park | Utah, USA |@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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The Kiss |@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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Unforgiven |@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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Three Magi |@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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Island in the Sky | Canyonlands National Park, Utah |@2015 Styliani Giannitsi Photography

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Utah desert in the winter

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Homestead

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Buffalo Panel | 9 Mile Canyon | Utah, USA

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Manifest Destiny

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Hunting Scene | 9 Mile Canyon | Utah, USA

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9 Mile Canyon National Monument

9 Mile Canyon | Utah, USA

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9 Mile Canyon | Utah, USA

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9 Mile Canyon | Utah, USA

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Smiley. Sad Face

Whale“The whales were breaching off Redondo (Beach) and this small sailboat maneuvered into the spot where the spout occurred,” photographer Eric Smith wrote in the comments. “I was roughly 50 feet from the whale and her calf when they surfaced next to the sailboat. The guy never looked up from his phone throughout the entire breach. Two women at the front of the boat were taking pictures but he didn’t notice.”

He told CBS News that a whale and her calf were “flapping, breaching, jumping, mouths eating fish,” but the man never budged. He said he has five photos of the man busy with his phone as the whales surface around the boat.

Read the full article here | The Huffington Post

Heart of Darkness | Alice Seeley Harris’s Photos Exposed the Horrors of Colonialism in the Congo

COLONIALISM

[It’s 1904. The Congo. A man sits on a porch, staring intensely at something. At first you can’t tell at what—but a closer look reveals the sickening truth: It’s the severed foot and hand of a child.

Nsala, the man in the picture, was photographed by English missionary Alice Seeley Harris after he arrived at her mission clutching a parcel that contained what was left of his five-year-old daughter. She’d been killed and dismembered as a punishment when his village failed to meet the rubber quotas demanded by the imperial regime.

Harris went on to take hundreds of pictures like this, documenting the violence, enslavement, and exploitation inflicted on the Congolese people by agents of the Belgian King Leopold II, Queen Victoria’s cousin. From 1885, Leopold ran the Congo Free State as his personal money spinner, getting rich off forced labor while pretending it was a humanitarian project. After they were made public, these pictures forced people in Europe to face what was really happening and, under public pressure, the Congo was signed over to the Belgian state in 1908. It wouldn’t gain independence until 1960.]

Read the full article here | VICE

Exhibit: Brutal Exposure: the Congo | 24 January to 7 June 2015 | International Slavery Museum, Liverpool, England

Why I Would Prefer a Police Officer Knocking at My Door, Than A Faceless Internet Accuser | Emmanuel Levinas, Identity and the Significance of the Face

[For the philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, the encounter with another’s face was the origin of identity — the reality of the other preceding the formation of the self. The face is the substance, not just the reflection, of the infinity of another person. And from the infinity of the face comes the sense of inevitable obligation, the possibility of discourse, the origin of the ethical impulse.

The connection between the face and ethical behavior is one of the exceedingly rare instances in which French phenomenology and contemporary neuroscience coincide in their conclusions. A 2009 study by Marco Iacoboni, a neuroscientist at the Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, explained the connection: “Through imitation and mimicry, we are able to feel what other people feel. By being able to feel what other people feel, we are also able to respond compassionately to other people’s emotional states.” The face is the key to the sense of intersubjectivity, linking mimicry and empathy through mirror neurons — the brain mechanism that creates imitation even in nonhuman primates.

Without a face, the self can form only with the rejection of all otherness, with a generalized, all-purpose contempt — a contempt that is so vacuous because it is so vague, and so ferocious because it is so vacuous. A world stripped of faces is a world stripped, not merely of ethics, but of the biological and cultural foundations of ethics….]

Read the full article here | The New York Times

FACELESS